Clark County Nevada revises permitting applicability policy for emergency engines.

February 3, 2017

The Clark County, Nevada (Las Vegas area) Department of Air Quality (DAQ) has changed their methodology for determining permitting applicability for emergency engines according to a January 25, 2017 Trinity Consultants report.

DAQ previously assumed continuous operation (i.e., 8,760 hours per year) when determining if potential annual emissions from emergency engines were above minor source permit thresholds given in Clark County Air Quality Regulation (CCAQR) Section 12.1. DAQ will now use 500 hours of annual operation for emergency engines potential emission calculations to determine whether a source must obtain a minor source permit.

DAQ is in the process of evaluating currently permitted sources to determine which emergency engines no longer need a minor source permit due to this change in calculation methodology. DAQ will notify those facilities that no longer need to maintain their minor source permit and will terminate the permit. These facilities will receive a Certificate of Non Applicability from DAQ for each affected source.

What this means to you
Clark County, Nevada has changed methodology for determining permitting for emergency engines. They previously assumed continuous operation (8,760 hours per year). Its Department of Air Quality will now use 500 hours of annual operation for emergency engines potential emission calculations to determine if a source needs a minor source permit.

MIRATECH can help
Contact MIRATECH for emergency engine emission compliance solutions in Nevada.