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  1. Gas Compression
  2. Power Generation
  3. Rail
  4. NESHAP Regulations
  5. Industrial
  6. Air Compression
  7. Liquids Pumping
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  1. Bi-Fuel Diesel and Natural Gas
  2. Diesel
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Noise Control

  1. Yes
  2. No

Engine Size

  1. 20 to 200 hp
  2. 200 to 1350 hp
  3. 1350 to 10,000 hp
  4. 10,000 hp and above

Regulated Pollutants

  1. NOx
  2. NO2
  3. CO
  4. VOC (NMNEHC)
  5. HAP's
  6. Particulate Matter (PM)
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EPA approves state of Texas’ Clean-Air Plan for ozone in Houston area. Clarifies status of revoked 1979, 1997 standards.

February 26, 2020

On February 6, 2020 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it has approved the state of Texas’ clean-air plan for ozone pollution in the Houston area, Kallanish Energy reports.

The EPA has determined the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria metropolitan area with its 6.7 million people continues to attain two federal ozone limits: the federal Clean Air Act’s 1979 1-hour limit of 120 parts per billion (Ppb); and the 1997 eight-hour standard of 80 Ppb.

The Houston area also meets the criteria for ending obligations to prevent the area from backsliding in air quality and potentially failing to meet the federal standards, the EPA said. The EPA announcement provides added clarity for clean-air regulators.

More stringent federal standards remain.

The state’s plans for ozone in the Houston area must now deal with the more-stringent federal 2008 eight-hour limit of 75 Ppb and 2015 eight-hour standard of 70 Ppb or less. For 2016-2018, the Houston area’s key ozone number was out of compliance at 78 Ppb.

The six-county Houston region is in what is called marginal nonattainment and has until 2021 to come into compliance or risk additional federal requirements. That new work will be directed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

The air quality in the Houston area, with its energy-based and chemical industries, is among the worst in the U.S. Last month, three Texas environmental groups reported the Houston area had 110 days in 2018 with unhealthy air pollution.

Houston-area ozone levels have improved since 1997-1999 when they were far worse and that improvement came during a period of significant economic growth.

What this means to you
The EPA has determined the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria metropolitan continues to attain two federal ozone limits: the federal Clean Air Act’s 1979 1-hour limit of 120 parts per billion (Ppb); and the 1997 eight-hour standard of 80 Ppb. EPS says it also meets the criteria for ending obligations to prevent the area from backsliding in air quality. The state’s plans for ozone in the Houston area must now deal with the more-stringent federal 2008 eight-hour limit of 75 Ppb and 2015 eight-hour standard of 70 Ppb or less.

Contact MIRATECH for stationary engine emission solutions in Texas.